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Class

The good: Yes, learning is fun. Being in a classroom is fun. Being in a classroom for something you chose, fun. Being amongst a bunch of adults who are not on their parents dime and are taking it seriously, fun.

The bad: Group homework. Yes, all homework. To be done by a group.

I run a strong risk of seeming like a super brownnosing nerdus maximus.

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( 22 comments — Leave a comment )
(Deleted comment)
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:50 pm (UTC)
No less than three to a group!

-.-
serendipity9000
Aug. 29th, 2007 03:54 am (UTC)
All homework is group homework? Don't profs of classes like this get that people have day jobs (and in my case kids)? All group homework is just a recipe for scheduling nightmare. Yes.. I am probably projecting my world on your world a bit... but jeez... sigh.

Good luck!
cheetahmaster
Aug. 29th, 2007 12:04 pm (UTC)
speaking of projecting
I'd hope that profs also get that group projects are a terrible idea, as they just drag down the good students to the level of the lowest in their group.
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:53 pm (UTC)
Re: speaking of projecting
I realized I was thinking that and that it made me egotistical. However, there is that risk. already envisioned emailing her what MY version of the homework would have been.
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:52 pm (UTC)
A lady with four kids and a day job raised her hand and was like, "Are you for real?"

The professor said "In the real world you have to work with people, so I want you to get that experience!"

And I thought to myself, "This is BIO class, not working with people class."

Meh.
msteleute
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:59 pm (UTC)
Hey, I'm' assuming 90% of the people there do have day jobs and therefore are working in the REAL WORLD and probably have been for some time. Way to make it more obnoxious for people Professor Idealist!
examorata
Aug. 29th, 2007 03:59 pm (UTC)
Seriously! This isn't a bunch of doofball 18-year-olds! It's the introductory BIO class, not NURS 304: Dealing With Stupid People or anything.
serendipity9000
Aug. 29th, 2007 02:11 pm (UTC)
I had a prof like that for my computer course last term. He took it to be part of his personal mission to ensure we got team experience. Personally, I don't need more *team* experience. The real world dumps that on your head pretty quick. Sounds like this prof hasn't done a lot of work with adult students perhaps?
(Deleted comment)
maroonmd
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:09 pm (UTC)
Ug! That's a nightmare!

If everyone is actually taking this seriously, it might not be too bad though. The worst part is finding time to meet up with each other. I mean, like you said, you're all working adults! Why does she expect this from you? Blarg. Maybe just cut it into pieces, and each of you do one part independently? heh.
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:54 pm (UTC)
Maybe just cut it into pieces, and each of you do one part independently?

One dude said to her, "Realistically, you know we're going to split it up." and she was like, "but that's not in the spirit of the exercise!"

*sigh*
maroonmd
Aug. 29th, 2007 03:30 pm (UTC)
Do it anyway! She'll never know... ;)
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 03:46 pm (UTC)
I don't really trust anyone else to do my homework. :-/
yoshimi
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:15 pm (UTC)
both of life_unexamined's spring semester classes involved a high percentage of group work. he had one really good group, and one not so good group. but the point is: he survived & thrived, or at least got good grades anyway. the one advantage is that it makes it much harder to procrastinate, especially when the classes are all on-line. good luck!
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 01:55 pm (UTC)
Thanks!! It only effects me insomuch as I don't want a B. I want an A. I need to make up for my poor performance in college ten years ago to get in to the nursing program so I don't feel I can cut corners. Mostly this means I will be the bossy one in the group. :)
pseudotheist
Aug. 29th, 2007 03:03 pm (UTC)
So, is the homework actually of an unusual type in that it needs a group to complete it?

Set up an e-mail list for your group.
Do all of the homework yourself.
Send it in an e-mail to the group, "This is my contribution to the group homework. Questions or comments?"

Better yet, agree that everyone sends out their results 2 days or so before it's due to be turned in, for comparison.
The only required group work should be working through disagreements on answers.
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 03:43 pm (UTC)
Yup, that's what i was thinking.
oontzgrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 06:36 pm (UTC)
The group homework thing sounds sucky. But on the brightside at least your class is full of adults. I think my class is pretty much 18 year olds with a couple of 20 year olds thrown in for spice.
snidegrrl
Aug. 29th, 2007 06:49 pm (UTC)
Ouch. I will also note that since it's a BIO class it is peppered with hopeful future nurses and physical therapists, which is kind of nice. As long as I can find two people who use email reliably, I can hopefully deal with the whole homework thing.
si1ent_hi11
Aug. 30th, 2007 12:43 am (UTC)
I got a new job working for a small green lizard a few weeks ago, and have been in classes learning the trade. They've had us performing daily team-building exercises which almost always end with me concocting on a "Plan B" in which I seize control of whatever fictional operation we're solving with an axe or something and the offending members get eaten. This is odd, because I'm usually so dispassionate about procedure and also not a cannibal. Additionally odd they would be pushing the team aspect, considering the solitary nature of the work I'll be doing...
snidegrrl
Aug. 30th, 2007 03:17 pm (UTC)
Well, congrats on the new job then? :)

Team building exercises at work which is already a trial every day is exactly why I feel like I shouldn't have to put up with this junk in class.
( 22 comments — Leave a comment )

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